Category Archives for "10+ Ways to Leave Your Pie Chart"

4 Verse 12 of 10+ Ways to Leave Your Pie Chart

My company recently became an Alteryx partner and I wanted to stretch my imagination on how to fulfill the promise of this blog series, and do something pretty cool. This final verse delivers a unique viz combining the data visualization power of Tableau + Alteryx (and replaces the pie charts from Verse 11)! Thank you for taking […]

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Verse 11 of 10+ Ways to Leave Your Pie Chart

Even I am starting to feel a little sorry for the pie chart.  My fellow viz peers generally accept using pie charts on maps. Andy (vizwiz.blogspot.com) might still not let this one pass as he says, “Friends don’t let friends use pie charts.” Use this approach to see big slices in big circles.  Small stuff not so much. Limiting to […]

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Verse 10 of 10+ Ways to Leave Your Pie Chart

The long tail whips up on the pie chart (inspired by Chris Anderson’s ‘The Long Tail,’ which nicely articulates the value of understanding all your sales, not just the highest.) While bar charts are the best substitute for a summary, the details matter. A compact way to display order distribution, while being able to see clusters. […]

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Verse 9 of 10+ Ways to Leave Your Pie Chart

Pareto beats out Playfair’s pie charts The Pareto (80/20) graph helps us analyze the distribution of sales with a category. We use bar charts to take the guessing out of which category has more sales. Though not the top seller, the high concentration of sales in Furniture is clearer. On an interesting note, William Playfair […]

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Verse 8 of 10+ Ways to Leave Your Pie Chart

SET THE AXIS DUAL MICHAEL {CRISTIANI} The Treachery of Averages™ is another of our 3 Villains of Data Visualization™ CLICK TO REGISTER FOR THE 3 VILLAINS WEBINAR This shifts the analysis focus to average sales, while retaining sales from the pie chart. While knowing the average is helpful, you need the context of the individual figures. […]

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Verse 7 of 10+ Ways to Leave Your Pie Chart

GROUP THEM IN A BIN CHRISTIAN {CHABOT} Bins are very handy for getting a deeper view into the distribution of your data. Bar charts are often used for binning; the heatmap is better suited to hierarchical data. You are easily able to see the concentration of activity and identify gaps. Color quickly emphasizes disparity in (sales) performance […]

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Verse 6 of 10+ Ways to Leave Your Pie Chart

FRAME A PANEL DISPLAY JJ {JENSEN} Panel, or trellis views, are great for organizing hierarchies of information in a small space. This is similar to using bar charts for comparison; though not as compact. You are easily able to see general clusters of values, i.e. in each row. Switching up your visuals gets attention and invites the […]

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Verse 5 of 10+ Ways to Leave Your Pie Chart

GET THE SHAPES IN A ROW RAMON {MARTINEZ} Strip plots are great for organizing hierarchies of information in a small space. Ordering different size data sets is simple (a heatmap leaves lots of empty boxes). Size and color gradients are the #2 and #3 easiest to interpret visual elements. This is similar to using bar charts […]

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Verse 4 of 10+ Ways to Leave Your Pie Chart

MAKE IT AN XY ROBITAILLE {RYAN} XY scatter plots are my go-to favorite.  They deliver a high density of information with clarity! Location (xy) is the easiest and fastest visualization trait for us to interpret. You can immediately see clusters of over-performers and under-performers. We have flexibility to apply additional traits, like size, to focus on what’s important. […]

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